Posts tagged with: rim and face

Converting Dial Indicator Cold Alignment Targets with the Fixturlaser NXA

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By on June 7, 2018

Even though laser shaft alignment systems have been in use for over 3 decades some industries have alignment tolerances and cold alignment targets in dial indicator terms or language. Take for instance the gas compression and processing industry. Many OEM’s, packagers, end users, and service companies use laser alignment systems, however their cold alignment targets […]

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Dial Indicator Alignment – Bar Sag Still Exists in 2018!

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By on April 17, 2018

And it just may be a lot more than you would think. While visiting a customer site to do an alignment check using the EVO laser alignment tool on a 1750 HP Electric Motor / Boiler Feed Water Pump / 3574 rpm, measurements were taken several times (x3) to make sure the values were repeatable.  […]

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The Language of Alignment

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By on December 24, 2015

Rim & Face, Angle & Offset, Parallel & Angular Deviation, Parallel Offset, thousands of inch and mils! What does it all mean? Actually it’s pretty much the same thing, though not exactly. I’ve been a VibrAlign Technical Trainer since 2008 with training classes in a variety of industries and with students previously using other methods […]

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Converting Laser Alignment System Readings to Rim and Face Dial Readings

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By on January 29, 2014

VibrAlign released the free Laser-Dials App to aid laser system users who need/want to convert their laser shaft alignment system results to rim and face dial indicator readings. You can also use the App to convert dial indicator readings to laser readings. Most are interested in converting laser results to dials so that is what […]

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Defining Angularity in Shaft Alignment

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By on November 27, 2012

There are only two types of measurements for shaft misalignment – offset, which may be called parallel or rim, and angularity, which is sometimes called slope, or face. Offset (parallel or rim) is easy to understand. One shaft is simply higher, lower, or to the left or right of the other one. But angularity can […]

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