Posts tagged with: “shaft alignment”

IT’S HAS TO BE ALIGNABLE!

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By on June 24, 2013

One of the issues precision shaft alignment technicians face is whether a machine is alignable. There will be times that a machine cannot be aligned in its current condition. A recent Fixturlaser GO Basic training class ran into this issue when performing alignment checks on 4 small centrifugal pumps.  All pumps had 10 HP electric […]

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Got Alignment Problems? Just Let Us Know!

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By on June 13, 2013

VibrAlign’s Shaft Alignment Training is the best in the industry.  We not only train maintenance personnel on how to use our tools – we teach alignment!  Lots of it!  We teach correcting soft foot, bolt bound problems, pipe strain, coupling problems – real world stuff. Our training staff has about one hundred combined years of […]

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Sof Shoe® Shims

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By on June 5, 2013

Soft foot is undoubtedly the number one challenge faced on an everyday basis in precision shaft alignment.  The concept is simple enough; make sure the machine feet rest flat on the base. Unfortunately, it is not always so simple to solve. Before sitting down to write this, I noted there are 17 articles posted on […]

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The Devil is in the Details!

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By on May 29, 2013

During the field alignment portion of a Fixturlaser GO Basic shaft alignment training class, we were attempting to align a 100 H.P., 3600 RPM  motor to a double suction pump. Sounds easy enough! Here’s the skinny… The pump and motor were the top set in a vertical, two unit skid made of I-beams and very […]

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Non-Repeatability, a Little Movement can Cause a Lot of Headaches!

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By on May 23, 2013

A recent Fixturlaser GO Basic Training class performed a field alignment on a 100 HP, 3 Phase, 5600 RPM electric motor coupled to a crude oil pump in a refinery.  The class decided it would be permissible to use the 3600 RPM setting in GO Basic active tolerance table, which is +/- 0.5 mils/1” angular […]

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Bolt Bound? No Alternate Move Calculator? No Problem!

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By on May 10, 2013

Previous blogs have discussed several different solutions for solving Base Bound & Bolt Bound conditions when preforming precision laser shaft alignment (Base/Bound Math and Solving Base/Bound Alignment Alignment Problems). Sometimes though, the solution for a Bolt Bound issue is fairly straight forward and what you need to do is right in front of your eyes […]

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How to Read an Alignment Report

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By on May 1, 2013

Most maintenance personnel understand that documenting a precision shaft alignment is a good idea, but don’t always understand how to interpret the data. Here is a quick primer on how to read a typical alignment report. This shaft alignment report happens to be from a Fixturlaser NXA Professional but all alignment reports should contain similar […]

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The Importance of Proper Alignment Technique and Being Aware of Movement

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By on April 17, 2013

During the OJT portion of a Fixturlaser GO Basic Training class, with the Army Corp of Engineers, the class aligned two electric motors driving large winch gearboxes on a dredging barge.  These winches are used to move the barge into position during dredging operations.  The class wanted to rotate both shafts to perform the alignments, […]

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The Shaft Alignment Nightmare

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By on April 10, 2013

Sometimes precision laser shaft alignment is a quick, neat, orderly maintenance task.  And sometimes, it is not!  Occasionally, everything that can be wrong IS wrong. While teaching a Fixturlaser Go Pro training class in Illinois, the class went into the plant for some “hands on” shaft alignment work.  The machine chosen was a 25 HP […]

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Shims 201 – The Importance of Measuring Shim Thickness

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By on March 28, 2013

Stainless steel shims are now the standard for use in shimming machinery when preforming a precision laser or dial indicator shaft alignment.  They are clean, corrosion resistant, flat, and most importantly, pre-cut.  Their use speeds up the alignment process significantly.  However, it is very important to measure the thickness of a shim before using it. […]

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Aligning Machines with 3 or 6 Feet

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By on February 28, 2013

Some machines are not manufactured with a typical 4 footed configuration.  Precision shaft alignments can still be easily accomplished on these “non-typical” machine configurations, if you remember a couple of simple rules. When aligning a machine with three feet, like this example (left), remember that you are positioning machinery in two planes: The inboard, or […]

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SHIMS 102 – The pitfalls of carbon steel shims.

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By on February 21, 2013

Stan’s “Shims 101” blog last year provided some great guidelines and reasons for using pre-cut Stainless Steel Shims.  We repeatedly see rotating equipment that is supplied with carbon steel shims under the feet and/or shims of the incorrect size. When aligning machinery with carbon steel shims get rid of them! Measure the old shim thickness […]

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The Importance of Roughing-in Machines before Performing a Shaft Alignment.

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By on January 24, 2013

During our Best Alignment Practices Training classes our staff of VibrAlign Trainers stresses the importance of rough aligning the machines as part of the pre-alignment steps.  The main reason to do so is to minimize the coupling influences on the movable and stationary machine’s rotational shaft center-lines so the final alignment can be completed with […]

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In Shaft Alignment, Low Can Sometimes Mean High!

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By on January 16, 2013

A customer in the northeast US was concerned that his laser wasn’t working properly.  He called into our office stating “the motor shaft is a ¼ inch low at the coupling, but the laser shows I need to remove a lot of shims from the motor feet – both front and rear”.  His thought was […]

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Flexible Couplings and Flexible Shafts

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By on January 10, 2013

Most mechanics are pretty familiar with flexible couplings.  They are designed with an elastomer, or flexible element, which compensates for slight amounts of misalignment through a sliding motion between the coupling hubs and the insert.  However, it is very important to have some idea as to how much the coupling will flex before it begins […]

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